MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – Dozens of metro-area community members are hoping their words will create change.

The group, “Neighborhoods Organizing for Change,” rallied at Minneapolis City Hall Friday.

The group is fighting for worker’s rights. Members have a problem with what they call police discrimination and low work wages. That includes more than minimum wage salaries, sick time and vacation options.

They also allege that young people are sometimes wrongly targeted and stopped by police.

“Neighborhoods Organizing for Change” is a group of more than 100 community members in the Twin Cities.

They say this rally is a way to take action and speak change into existence.

One person spoke about his encounter with police in which he believes he was being targeted.

But, for the most part, the biggest concerns heard about Friday involved pay and benefits.

When it comes to job-related issues, some say they’ve been required to work the midnight shift, then an early shift the next day.

They’re also concerned about employees who don’t have paid sick time and are forced to make a decision between working or taking care of a child who may be sick.

“I ran the shop by myself. Sometimes I didn’t get to eat. Sometimes I didn’t get to use the restroom. So at the end of the day, we’re trying to make a difference for people who don’t have fair scheduling,” Saqueliah Cowell, who was at the rally, said.

“I’m really proud to stand here to today with working people of Minneapolis to pledge my support for passing fair scheduling, paid sick time and the end to wage theft as soon as possible. I think we can get it done this year,” member Lisa Bender said.

On Thursday, Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges laid out her plan to improve public safety, education and others ways to create a better city. Improving income inequality was also on that list,which is one of the group’s concerns.

At Friday’s rally, they applauded her efforts.

The Minneapolis City Council held its regular meeting Friday, shortly after the rally ended.

So, the group went into chambers, not to speak, but just to be there as a way to show, we’re here, we’re not going anywhere until we make a difference.

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