The Minneapolis Institute of Art currently has an exceedingly unique—and fantastic, in every sense of the word—exhibit in place right now: Guillermo del Toro: At Home with Monsters, an overview of the extensive collection of horror and fantasy filmmaker Guillermo del Toro .

(credit: Amy Rea)

This is a jaw-dropping exhibit that encompasses a wide variety of mediums and motifs.

(credit: Amy Rea)

Much of the exhibit comes from del Toro’s personal collection, which he houses in a mansion, called Bleak House, in suburban Los Angeles. It reflects his wide-ranging interests in a spectacular way.

(credit: Amy Rea)

Frankenstein is one of his obsessions and muses, so it’s a fun juxtaposition to see a Frankenstein artwork placed with a photo of del Toro as a child.

(credit: Amy Rea)

Perhaps not surprisingly, del Toro has a strong interest in some of Disney’s animated works, which makes sense; many of Disney’s films have dark themes and scenes, such as in Sleeping Beauty.

(credit: Amy Rea)

There are costumes and set pieces from iconic films including Pacific Rim.

(credit: Amy Rea)

Or this book from Pan’s Labyrinth.

(credit: Amy Rea)

And, of course, the Faun from Pan.

(credit: Amy Rea)

Del Toro is a prolific keeper of journals, which are fascinating to explore on their own. They’re filled with sketches and detailed art, with a mix of English and Spanish.

(credit: Amy Rea)

He’s also fascinated with flora and fauna, in great detail.

(credit: Amy Rea)

Victoriana has a strong influence on his work, as seen in these costumes from Crimson Peak.

(credit: Amy Rea)

And in miniatures and curio cabinets.

(credit: Amy Rea)

There are numerous homages to artists who influenced del Toro, including—of course—Alfred Hitchcock, Edgar Allan Poe, and H.P. Lovecraft.

The exhibit is open through May 28. Tickets are required, and don’t wait until the last minute—this is a very popular exhibit, and may sell out in high-demand time slots. Note: Mia considers this an R-rated exhibit. Parents may want to visit it by themselves to determine if it’s OK for young children/tweens.

What else is happening in our state? Be sure to check out the 10 p.m. Sunday night WCCO newscasts, where you can learn more in the weekly segment, Finding Minnesota.

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