WASHINGTON, D.C. (WCCO) — A cry for gun control across the country Saturday.

From Washington D.C. to Chicago to Philadelphia — even here in Minnesota, young people are leading the charge for change.

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A pivotal moment Saturday was a period of silence for the victims of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida.

“Since the time that I came out here, it has been six minutes and 20 seconds. The shooter has ceased shooting and will soon abandon his rifle, blend in with the students as they escape, and walk free for an hour before arrest,” Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Emma Gonzalez said. “Fight for your lives before it’s someone else’s job.”

Joining the D.C. march Saturday was a group of students from Henry Sibley High School in Mendota Heights.

These students are on a mission to make history by impacting America’s future.

“The energy of these kids is going to change the world,” trip organizer Joe Campbell said.

These teenagers from Henry Sibley High School teamed up with even more students from the Twin Cities for the March For Our Lives rally in Washington, D.C.

They carried their messages straight to the Capitol — joined by hundreds of thousands of people devoted to the same cause.

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“I’m light on my feet, I can’t believe how many people are here. I’m just proud, loud and proud to be here with our signs and just showing that we care,” Henry Sibley student Liam Hickey said.

They listened as survivors of school shootings spoke about ideas to prevent the next one.

Derek Dean carried with him a sign highlighting the victims of the Stoneman Douglas and Sandy Hook shootings.

“It’s six years in between, nothing really has changed but now things are going to change because of kids like that, students like that, brought us all together,” Dean said.

Saturday’s rally brought upon countless emotions for the students of Henry Sibley High School, but near the top was gratitude. For it was $30,000 in donations that helped make this entire trip possible for them.

“I’m endlessly grateful that they took their time and money to donate to us,” Hickey said.

And it all started thanks to Campbell, a Henry Sibley graduate.

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“My hope is that they go back and make a difference at our Capitol and at the ballot box,” Campbell said.

Jeff Wagner