MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – A Twin Cities high school has a resolution for the New Year: It’s committing to be more green by setting a big goal.

Three Irondale High school students asked the administration to commit to 100% clean energy by 2030.

Senior Lily Cartier, junior Sabrina Deriche and sophomore Iman Deriche are all in the Environmental Club at Irondale High School and they all share a fear for the world that they hope to live in one day.

“I don’t know if I’ll have a full life at this rate,” Sabrina Deriche said.

To change that rate, they want Irondale High School to pledge to using only in the next 10 years.

“This is the year where if we don’t fix it by then, there will be irreversible climate change,” Cartier said.

Back in October, they brought their signs to the Mounds View School District board to defend their fears and persuade a room full of adults why it’s important to set this ambitious goal.

Lily Cartier, Iman Deriche and Sabrina Deriche (credit: CBS)

“You could see that some of them were rooting for us, which was amazing,” Sabrina Deriche said.

“It could set like show other school districts that it’s possible and it’s something they could do,” Cartier said.

To reach their goal, they want add more solar panels to the building and remove single use plastic.

“We’ve been trying to remove straws from the cafeteria because it actually does have a huge impact especially because students can pick them up by themselves so they can take multiple which is very unfortunate,” Sabrina Deriche said.

These friends are proving it doesn’t matter how young you are or small in number, anyone can lead a change. This whole process has inspired them to set career goals as well.

“I am very interested in environmental law,” Sabrine Deriche said.

“Maybe I could do environmental engineering and come up with new renewable energy sources,” Iman Deriche said.

All three of those students will no longer be at Irondale High School in the year 2030, so they plan to train the next group of environmental club leaders to carry on their legacy. All three students credit their science teachers who have helped them make this pledge and get approval by the school board.

Marielle Mohs

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