High Heat/Humidity Expected Throughout The WeekBy Lisa Meadows

UPDATE (2:30 p.m. Monday): Much-needed rain is falling in northern Minnesota, with some severe weather moving through.

Strong winds and hail are to be expected in these areas.

UPDATE (11:30 a.m. Monday): Severe storms are possible for parts of northern Minnesota Monday. Hail and damaging winds are the main threat.

UPDATE (10 a.m. Monday):  The hot and overall dry pattern continues. Much of the state will hit the 90s Monday and stay in the 90s this week. Humidity will be on the climb, too, bringing heat indices near 100 degrees at times, WCCO meteorologist Lisa Meadows reports.

There should be a temperature gradient between most of Minnesota vs northeastern Minnesota and northern Wisconsin due to flow off Lake Superior and a cold front northeast. So, highs Tuesday and Wednesday may only reach the 70s in those locations compared to the 90s for the metro.

There are a few small rain chances Tuesday and Wednesday in the evening for the metro, though most of this will fall north of Interstate 94.

Hoping for a better shot at rain Saturday.

Read the previous version of the story below: 

It’s going to feel a lot like the dog days of summer this week. WCCO Director of Meteorology Mike Augustyniak says the heat and humidity will climb all week long.

A streak of 90-plus degree days in the Twin Cities will start Monday, with a high of 91 expected. By Thursday and Friday, it could feel like 100.

The metro will approach the 90s Sunday, with a high of 88. Dew points will drop throughout the day, but begin to climb again overnight. Temperatures will be similar across the state.

Northern Minnesota will stay cooler this week due to a stalled front. That front could also cause focused thunderstorm activity on Monday and Tuesday. The rest of the state is expected to stay mostly dry, with more rain chances next weekend.

According to the Department of Natural Resources, half of Minnesota is experiencing severe drought and around 4% of the state is experiencing extreme drought.

Lisa Meadows