By WCCO-TV Staff

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The 2021 Minneapolis election is nearly here (early voting is available) and voters will encounter three questions that propose amendments to the City Charter. WCCO has what you need to know as you go to the polls.

The first question voters will encounter, City Question 1, asks if the city should give more power to the mayor of Minneapolis.

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Here’s a brief overview of the question and what it means. Caroline Cummings also did an in-depth report on the question.

Question in full:

Shall the Minneapolis City Charter be amended to adopt a change in its form of government to an Executive Mayor-Legislative Council structure to shift certain powers to the Mayor, consolidating administrative authority over all operating departments under the Mayor, and eliminating the Executive Committee?

YES ______

NO ______

What would happen if the “Yes” vote wins?

Minneapolis would shift to a “strong mayor” government structure, meaning the mayor would essentially have more power. The mayor would become the chief executive of the city and will have authority over general executive and administrative systems.

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As for the separation of powers, the amendment would mean that “neither the City Council nor any Council committee or member may usurp, invade, or interfere with the Mayor’s direction or supervision of the administration.”

The Executive Committee — which consists of the mayor, the city council president and up to three council members — would also be eliminated.

Charter amendment questions require 51% or more of the votes cast on each question to pass.

What would happen if the “No” vote wins?

The city’s government would remain as a “weak mayor” structure, with the mayor and city council keeping the powers they currently have.

However, if Question 2 on public safety passes as a “yes” vote, it would take some power from the mayor. The mayor currently has complete power over the police department, which would be removed from the city charter and replaced by the Department of Public Safety should that amendment pass. The new department would be overseen by both the mayor and city council. More on that here.

Also, if Question 3 passes as a “yes” vote, it would give power to the city council to regulate rent for private residential properties. More on that here. 

RESOURCES: 

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